Adam Vine’s Lurk Audiobook Blog Tour

Author: Adam Vine

Narrator: Kevin Meyer

Length: 9h 46m

Publisher: Lilydog Books⎮2017

Genre: Horror

Release date: Jan. 16, 2017

Some secrets should stay buried….

College student Drew Brady never wanted the power to spy on his friends. But late one night, he finds a box of old Polaroids buried under his house that can change to show him whatever he desires, and Drew finds himself with the power to watch the people around him without them ever knowing.

Yet as Drew falls deeper into the rabbit hole of jealousy and despair, he begins having strange visions of the students who lived at the house 20 years ago and the gruesome fates they met after moving out. He finds evidence of a stalker who may be living on the property. The line between reality and nightmare blurs. Drew realizes there is something under the house that is manipulating him through the pictures, an eldritch, not-quite-dead thing that will drive him to do unspeakable evil if he doesn’t look away….

A blistering horror story, Lurk is unlike anything you’ve ever heard.

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Adam Vine was born in Petaluma, California. By day, he is a game writer and designer. He has lived in four different countries and visited almost thirty. His short fiction has appeared in various horror, science fiction, and literary fiction magazines and anthologies. When he is not writing, he is traveling, reading something icky, or teaching himself to play his mandolin. He currently lives in Germany.


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A devoted Midwesterner, raised in rural Wisconsin and transplanted to Tulsa, Oklahoma over three decades ago. A career-long voice-over and music radio guy, my iPhone playlist ranges from Alice Cooper and Waylon Jennings to Twenty One Pilots and The Zac Brown Band. Favorite reads are dominated by political biographies (Lincoln, Truman, Kennedy)…and Stephen King. And now Adam Vine…’cause day-um that Drew Brady is one twisted mother!

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May 7: Read Day and Night
A Book and A Latte

May 8: Dab of Darkness

May 9: The Desert Bibliophile

May 10: CGB Blog Tours

May 11: The Pursuit of Bookishness

May 12: Lomeraniel

May 13: There Are Books

May 14: Lilly’s Book World

May 15: The Bookworm Lodge

May 16: Ronelle Antoinette

May 17: Avid Book Collector

May 18: Between the Coverz

May 19: A Book and A Latte

May 20: Bound 4 Escape

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Review: Omari and the People (Audiobook)

Omari and the People (Audiobook) by Stephen Whitfield, Read by Curt Simmons
Omari and the People (Audiobook) by Stephen Whitfield, Read by Curt Simmons

★★★★1/2 (4.5 out of 5)

Official Synopsis:  In a squalid ancient city on the edge of a desert (based in part on the Empty Quarter in Arabia) a weary, thrill-seeking thief named Omari sets his home afire to start anew and to cover his many crimes. When the entire city is unintentionally destroyed by the flames, the cornered thief tells the displaced people a lie about a better place which only he can lead them to, across the desert. With the help of an aged, mysterious woman who knows a better place actually does exist, they set out. The disparate people must come together to fight their way through bandits, storms, epidemics, and more. As a result of Omari’s involvement with Saba, a fiercely independent woman who is out to break him in the pay of a merchant whom he has offended, his ability to lead his life and the success of the caravan – is jeopardized.

Nearly all of the folktales that survive today have origins in the oral tradition.  They were passed down from generation to generation and from culture to culture by master storytellers.  Omari and the People, by Stephen Whitfield, is written in the style of a folktale — one that tells the story of a hero’s journey to save himself and his wandering band of nomads — and as such is a perfect fit for the audiobook format.  Having Curt Simmons performing the narration just makes it that much better!

Whitfield’s prose is simple and stark, yet utterly powerful.  As the story unfolds, we travel with the titular Omari and his caravan as they search for a new life beyond the seemingly endless swaths of desert separating them from their potential future.  The story may seem simple on the surface — a group of characters must travel from Point A to Point B despite numerous conflicts — but Omari and the People is far from simplistic.  Trials and tribulations abound as Omari and his fellow travelers must come to terms with sandstorms, food shortages, infectious diseases, insects, raiders, water shortages, and deeper philosophical issues.  Even in its quietest moments, Omari and the People never slows down.

As a protagonist, Omari is deeply flawed.  His past is dark and his decision-making abilities are almost certainly compromised by those around him.  Will he do what needs to be done to save his people?  Or will he succumb to the temptations of his past and present?

This novel is essentially a classic epic hero’s journey and the audiobook narration of Curt Simmons only adds to this sense of grandeur.  Simmons’ voice takes on a not-quite-placeable Middle-Eastern accent which he somehow manages to keep up for the nearly eleven-and-a-half hours of run-time.  His performance is multi-layered and manages to capture the characters in amazing, nuanced detail.  Simply put, Simmons’ narration is a revelation.  (Seriously.  Check out samples of his other work on Audible.com.  He always seems to bring something completely fresh to each performance!)

If and when I listen to audiobooks, they are nearly always non-fiction in nature due to the fact that I can listen to them without having to pay too close attention to plot points or character arcs. Omari and the People, and Simmons’ narration in particular, may very well change this as I found myself so completely drawn into the tale!  Although the conclusion wasn’t as satisfying as I had hoped it would be, this audiobook gets my complete recommendation.  Do yourself a favor and grab a copy of Omari and the People today!

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I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions in exchange for an honest review.  The tour is being sponsored by Stephen Whitfield and Curt Simmons.  

Author Stephen Whitfield

Chicago-born Stephen Whitfield began writing as a Marine Corps print journalist. His writing has appeared in military publications, as well as the Kansas City Star and the Jersey Journal. He holds degrees from Loyola University Chicago, Chicago Theological Seminary, and Indiana University. His various adventures have taken him to such places as London, Paris, Trondheim, Johannesburg, Beirut, most of The Virgin Islands and the wilder neighborhoods of Chicago.

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Narrator Curt Simmons
Narrator Curt Simmons

Curt lives in Seattle and produces and narrates audiobooks in his home studio. He began his performing career in college as a stage actor and radio personality. After college, in addition to acting, Curt also did voiceovers for commercials, which he also wrote, directed, and edited for broadcast TV. Following the birth of his daughter in 1984, he left the performing arts to pursue a more “stable” profession managing projects. Then, in 2014 he returned to the professional stage for the first time in over 30 years as Walter Flood in Becky’s New Car by Stephen Dietz. He has also appeared recently as Lyman in Other Desert Cities by Jon Robin Baitz and Ralph in The Last Romance by Joseph DiPietro. Omari and the People is Curt’s sixth audiobook.

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Review: Be Light Like a Bird by Monika Schröder

Be Light Like a Bird by Monika Schröder (Capstone Young Readers)

★★★★☆ (4 out of 5)

Sometimes big things come in small packages.  Such is the case with Monika Schröder’s newest novel, Be Light Like a Bird.

Coming in at only 240 pages, Be Light Like a Bird tells the story of Wren, a twelve-year-old who recently lost her father unexpectedly in a plane crash.  Her mother fails to offer her the support she so desperately needs, and the two of them travel from town to town hoping to start a new life.  They eventually settle in Pyramid, Michigan where Wren must not only deal with her mother’s cold demeanor, but a multitude of other issues as well.

This middle-grade novel tackles many weighty topics such as bullying, peer pressure, nature conservation, the rights of indigenous peoples, death, and the ability to forgive and it does so in a manner that even younger students would be able to process.  The language is simple.  The sentences are short.  But the overall effect will leave a lasting impact.

I will definitely recommend Be Light Like a Bird to my middle-school students and adults as well!

Be Light Like a Bird will be released on September 1, 2016 and can be purchased HERE.

A big thank you goes out to NetGalleyMonika Schröder, and Capstone Young Readers for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review!

Recently Added to My TBR List

Here are three new(ish) books that have recently earned a place on my TBR list:

Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson

The acclaimed New York Times bestselling and National Book Award–winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming delivers her first adult novel in twenty years.

Running into a long-ago friend sets memory from the 1970s in motion for August, transporting her to a time and a place where friendship was everything—until it wasn’t. For August and her girls, sharing confidences as they ambled through neighborhood streets, Brooklyn was a place where they believed that they were beautiful, talented, brilliant—a part of a future that belonged to them.

But beneath the hopeful veneer, there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where ghosts haunted the night, where mothers disappeared. A world where madness was just a sunset away and fathers found hope in religion.

Like Louise Meriwether’s Daddy Was a Number Runner and Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina, Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn heartbreakingly illuminates the formative time when childhood gives way to adulthood—the promise and peril of growing up—and exquisitely renders a powerful, indelible, and fleeting friendship that united four young lives.

 

The Hike by Drew Magary

When Ben, a suburban family man, takes a business trip to rural Pennsylvania, he decides to spend the afternoon before his dinner meeting on a short hike. Once he sets out into the woods behind his hotel, he quickly comes to realize that the path he has chosen cannot be given up easily. With no choice but to move forward, Ben finds himself falling deeper and deeper into a world of man-eating giants, bizarre demons, and colossal insects.

On a quest of epic, life-or-death proportions, Ben finds help comes in some of the most unexpected forms, including a profane crustacean and a variety of magical objects, tools, and potions. Desperate to return to his family, Ben is determined to track down the “Producer,” the creator of the world in which he is being held hostage and the only one who can free him from the path.

At once bitingly funny and emotionally absorbing, Magary’s novel is a remarkably unique addition to the contemporary fantasy genre, one that draws as easily from the world of classic folk tales as it does from video games. In The Hike, Magary takes readers on a daring odyssey away from our day-to-day grind and transports them into an enthralling world propelled by heart, imagination, and survival.

Uproot: Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture by Jace Clayton

In 2001 Jace Clayton was an unknown DJ who recorded a three-turntable, sixty-minute mix and put it online to share with friends. Within weeks, Gold Teeth Thief became an international calling card, whisking Clayton away to play a nightclub in Zagreb, a gallery in Osaka, a former brothel in Sao Paolo, and the American Museum of Natural History. Just as the music world made its fitful, uncertain transition from analog to digital, Clayton found himself on the front lines of creative upheavals of art production in the twenty-first century globalized world.

Uproot is a guided tour of this newly-opened cultural space. With humor, insight, and expertise, Clayton illuminates the connections between a Congolese hotel band and the indie-rock scene, Mexican rodeo teens and Israeli techno, and Whitney Houston and the robotic voices is rural Moroccan song, and offers an unparalleled understanding of music in the digital age.

Review: Ghost Talkers by Mary Robinette Kowal

Ghost Talkers by Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor Books)

★★★★★ (5 out of 5)

Summary

Ghost Talkers takes place in an alternate version of World War I in which the British are utilizing mediums to communicate with the dead in order to learn military intelligence.  The protagonist is Ginger Stuyvesant, an American heiress serving as one of these “ghost talkers”  in London with her fiancé, a British military intelligence officer.  The members of this Spirit Corps are being targeted by the Germans and they may even have a traitor hidden amongst them.  After a catastrophic loss, Ginger must set out to save the day — and the war!

(More or less) Spoiler-Free Review

As it happened, I finished reading Mary Robinette Kowal’s wonderful Ghost Talkers the day after what would have been Alfred Hitchcock’s 117th birthday.  I mention this here only because this novel would have made for one hell of a Hitchcock film!  Here are just a few similarities:

  • Like a majority of Hitchcock’s films, Ghost Talkers is, at its heart, a mystery.
  • It is chock-full of red herrings.  For example, I really thought that another one of Ginger’s co-workers was the traitor!
  • Spies!  Hitchcock loved putting spies and counterspies in his films.  There are plenty of them in Ghost Talkers.
  • Ginger and her team work behind the scenes, against the odds, to defeat the Germans.  Like the characters in many Hitchcock films, they are the unsung heroes of the war effort.
  • Lots of snappy dialogue — especially between Ginger and her fiancé, Captain Benjamin Harford.  They form a (cough, cough) solid team that you can’t help but root for.

To be honest, Ghost Talkers took me by surprise.  I have never been a fan of books about war and I find even the idea of mediums to be downright silly.  Regardless, Mary Robinette Kowal makes it all work.  After the opening few pages, I was hooked and quickly made my way through the book.

According to a comment the author left on Goodreads, there is a possibility that Ghost Talkers could wind up being the first in a series of books about Ginger and her team, “if the response to this one is good.”  As far as this reviewer is concerned, the response should be overwhelmingly positive and I hope to read more about this kick-ass heroine in the future!

Many thanks to Mary Robinette Kowal, Netgalley, and Tor Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for this honest review.

Ghost Talkers was released today and can be purchased HERE.

Review: The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney (Tim Duggan Books)

★★★★ (4 out of 5)

Thanks to NetGalley, Crown Publishing, and Tim Duggan Books, I was able to read Lisa McInerney’s The Glorious Heresies ahead of its American release date. Below is my unbiased review:

The Glorious Heresies is a bleak look at the underworld of modern Cork as told through a handful of intertwining storylines. There is murder, drugs, prostitution, rape and somehow, in the end, a little bit of hope.

Despite nearly every character being guilty of despicable acts, the author does a fine job of humanizing each and every one of them. She even interjects a welcome touch of humor from time to time — especially in the character of Maureen, who is guilty of murder AND burning down a church!

I usually don’t like stories in which all of the characters seems inexplicably intertwined (I hated Crash!), but McInerney spins her tale in such a way as to make these interactions seem completely plausible.

All in all, this debut novel is one that I would recommend — especially for fans of gritty, urban dramas — and I look forward to reading more of McInerney’s work.

The Glorious Heresies was released on August 9, 2016.  Order it HERE.

Review: The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (Sourcebooks Fire)

★★★1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Rin Chupeco’s The Bone Witch has been garnering a lot of online buzz prior to its March 2017 release — and rightly so.  It’s like Memoirs of a Geisha, if only the geisha were magic-wielding warriors who fight evil across the land.  Sounds great, right?  And in principle, it is.  In principle.

The Bone Witch tells the story of Tea, an asha.  Think of asha as geisha who not only have to entertain paying guests, but must also learn and use magic for a variety of purposes.  Tea herself is a Dark asha, or Bone Witch, in that she can use necromancy to raise the dead — something she does “accidentally” a couple of times throughout the novel to varying effect.  Sounds pretty interesting so far, right?  And when you add in dangerous mystical creatures, an enemy known as Faceless, a little romance, and plots of revenge, we should be looking at YA Fantasy Book-of-the-Year.  So what’s the problem?

Unfortunately, a majority of the novel (at least 90% of it — no joke) focuses on Tea’s training and learning the ways of the asha and it features is A LOT of exposition!  Huge chunks of the book are taken up with people simply explaining things to Tea.  I have to admit that I lost interest multiple times throughout the read and had to step away from it from time to time. Whatever happened to the concept of “show, don’t tell”?  And since 90% of the book is about Tea’s training, the whole thing feels like a like a set-up — with very little actual reward and only the promise of more to come.

And there will be more to come.  In response to a question on Goodreads asking if this will become part of a trilogy, Chupeco stated that she will at least write a sequel.  Good!  Because the world she has created in The Bone Witch universe is an intriguing one that should be revisited.  But I hope that when she does, she puts all of Tea’s training to good use — because I’ve seriously had enough exposition already!

So, if you’re looking for a new YA series with lots of action, look elsewhere.  But if you want a fantasy with some terrific world-building, interesting characters, and the hope of exciting times to come, go ahead and give The Bone Witch a try!

Also, it should be noted that the cover art is absolutely wonderful!

A special thanks goes out to Rin Chupeco, NetGalley, and Sourcebooks Fire for the advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

The Bone Witch will be released on March 7, 2017.  Pre-order your copy HERE.